WHAT WE’VE LEARNT – OUR ADOPTION BLOG

Welcome to our little blog. We wanted to share some of our thoughts, experiences and things that we’ve learnt being adoptive parents, in the hope that it can help others. There will be all sorts of things in here about courses we’ve been on, books we’ve read, money saving tips along with general updates about the site.

In a few places, we will talk about certain things that we’ve bought as gifts or were gifted to us, we’ve linked to those in the adoption gifts section of the site as well for ease of reference in case anything interests you.

This page shows our 5 latest blogs, you can see more by following the ‘Older Entries’ link at the bottom of the page.

Book Review 5: William Wobbly and the Very Bad Day by Sarah Naish & Rosie Jefferies

Book Review 5: William Wobbly and the Very Bad Day by Sarah Naish & Rosie Jefferies

This book strikes me as one to use a puppet with. I found this great one which is just like SPARK the dragon. We’ve used puppets a lot in our therapy sessions as it allows Owl to act out and ‘voice’ things – but it’s not ‘them’. The therapist has then picked up on the key parts by saying to the puppet “Oh dear I imagine Spark found that VERY scary. I’m wondering if spark thought it would be easier to stay quiet during those scary fights” or things along this line. Owl has reacted VERY well to this and it’s something we’ve done at home. We’ve bought a few puppets here and there and when re-reading these books with both kids, we let them act out the stories, ask questions and they seem to voice things they otherwise wouldn’t say – as it’s not them it’s “spark”!
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Book Review 4: Spark Learns to Fly by Judith Foxon

Book Review 4: Spark Learns to Fly by Judith Foxon

This book strikes me as one to use a puppet with. I found this great one which is just like SPARK the dragon. We’ve used puppets a lot in our therapy sessions as it allows Owl to act out and ‘voice’ things – but it’s not ‘them’. The therapist has then picked up on the key parts by saying to the puppet “Oh dear I imagine Spark found that VERY scary. I’m wondering if spark thought it would be easier to stay quiet during those scary fights” or things along this line. Owl has reacted VERY well to this and it’s something we’ve done at home. We’ve bought a few puppets here and there and when re-reading these books with both kids, we let them act out the stories, ask questions and they seem to voice things they otherwise wouldn’t say – as it’s not them it’s “spark”!
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Book Review 3:  A book for the adults this time!

Book Review 3: A book for the adults this time!

I first read this book when I was a prospective adopter.  Of the many many books recommended by Social Services, I particularly loved this one.  It was a very easy book to read.  I loved the ‘glossary’ which laid out many terms which seemed strange before we had children (i.e.:  Insecure Attachment) and which social workers and other professionals used like a short hand language.  
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2nd Book Review: A Safe Place for Rufus by Jill Seeney

2nd Book Review: A Safe Place for Rufus by Jill Seeney

I wish we’d had this story when our kids first moved into our home as once we did find this book (2 years into placement), it gave great comfort to both of our kids. The kids were so happy that Rufus finally found ‘his’ place in his new home and over time so have our kids. Encouraged by this book, both kids accepted our offer of some comfy pillows, and blankets, and make dens out of them and when they are feeling particularly sore over something, they will go there to calm down! I’ve even heard of some families buying those pop up in play tents, so that they can create a ‘safe’ place for their kids to retreat to from time to time; which would probably be easier than our blanket tents!
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1st Book Review!: The Huge Bag of Worries by Virginia Ironside

1st Book Review!: The Huge Bag of Worries by Virginia Ironside

Owl (our eldest) is an Avoidant Attached child, this means they want to do EVERYTHING by themselves. A few years into placement now and we ‘practise’ asking for help, but it’s still a daily struggle. So from time to time we revisit The HUGE BAG of WORRIES and remind Owl that many worries they are carrying around are worries that many children who have been adopted have – this has reassured Owl that they are not ‘different’. A definite read for all adopted kids, but really helpful for those who are avoidant and don’t reach out for help as often as they could!
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